Home
Site Map
Contact
Links     ©
Birthplace of Ice Hockey
Windsor,  Nova  Scotia, Canada – c. 1800
by Garth Vaughan © 2001
Hants County Logo & Link
 

Origin   Evolution   Hockeyists   Windsor

Birthplace
Overview


Long Pond Story
Long Version
Short Version


Supporting Maps
1786 – "Plan" for King’s
Windsor – Anson Map
1871 – Church Map
1879 – Hendry Map
1880 – Roe Bros Map

1878 – Bird’s Eye View


BIG Maps
1786 – "Plan" for King’s
Windsor – Anson Map
1871 – Church Map
Aerial View/Church
1879 – Hendry Map
1880 – Roe Bros Map

1878 – Bird’s Eye View
Map to Long Pond

Other
1842 – TCH/King’s Deed

Compilation of Maps

Tourism Links

Long Pond Photos

 

 

The Long "Long Pond" Story
Haliburton’s Long Pond –
Researced and Written by Holly Hammett-Vaughan

Much of our information and sources have come from collections at Nova Scotia Archives and Records Management (NSARM), the Halifax Regional Library System (HRL) and the Crown Lands Office. We have reproduced various original source materials for this site, with their kind permission.

Bibliography

1 – Notes on the History of King’s College
by Fenwick Williams Vroom
NSARM – Nova Scotia Archives & Records Management
V/F v.14 #16
Pg 4

2 – John Clarke’s [Clark] Land Grant – 1786
Crown Lands Office
General Index of Grants from 1730 to 1937 Inclusive

3A Plan of Lands Proposed by John Clarke [Clark], Esquire for the Academy or College at Windsor – 25th Sept. 1789
NSARM – Nova Scotia Archives & Records Management

4 – Windsor, Nova Scotia – a journey in history
by Leslie Loomer
Published by the West Hants Historic Society, Windsor, Nova Scotia 1996
HRL 971.635 L 863w
Pg 120

5A Plan of Lands Proposed by John Clarke [Clark], Esquire for the Academy or College at Windsor – 25th Sept. 1789
NSARM – Nova Scotia Archives & Records Management

6 – The History of King’s College School – Windsor, Nova Scotia 1788-1938 –
Harris, R. [Reginald Vanderbilt]
Published by "The Outlook", Middleton, Nova Scotia, 1938
HRL SG Ref 373.7163 h315h
pg 16

7 – Notes on the History of King’s College
by Fenwick Williams Vroom
PANS V/F v.14 #16
Pg 4

8Haliburton Family Letters 1789 – 1893
Nova Scotia Historical Review
Vol 13 #1 1993
NSARM – Nova Scotia Archives & Records Management
Reading Room
Pg 117 – 118

9 – Thomas Chandler Haliburton ("Sam Slick") – A Study in Provincial Toryism
Chittick, V.L.O. (Professor in the Division of Literature and Language at Reed College)
Published NY, Columbia University Press 1924
HRL
SG 921 H172c

pg 25 – 26

10Plan of the Township of Windsor from an Actual Survey by Wm. [William] Anson, Deputy Surveyor
[Handwritten note reads "about 1820"]
NSARM – Nova Scotia Archives & Records Management
V7/230 – 1820
(Copy) J.A. McCallum, Dy [Deputy] Surveyor 1893 –
Shows – J Clark Esq’s lands
Shows – King’s College Lands purchased from John Clark in 1789
Shows – Land owned by John Clark which his heirs sold to T.C. Haliburton in 1833
Shows – Butler Estate, "Martock"

11 – Loomer, Leslie – Windsor, Nova Scotia, a journey in history –
Published by the West Hants Historic Society, Windsor, Nova Scotia, 1996
HRL 971,635 L863w

Pg 124…
Spruce Grove Farm was the Isaac Deschamps property…

The merchant, Benjamin DeWolf bought the Grove…

Lord and Lady Dalhousie spent much of the summer at the Grove, which they had leased. In 1822, William Anson, a deputy surveyor, demonstrated his superior skill in penmanship and drawing to produce a large map of the grove properties belonging to the Fraser boys…

Haliburton had Anson copy a map for use in his History. Haliburton referred to him as "a beautiful draftsman"…


12 – A Century of Haliburton’s Nova Scotia
by Archibald MacMechan
Pub 1930
NSARM – Nova Scotia Archives & Records Management
V/F v105 #27

Pg 1 – 3
…[In the year] 1823…in Halifax [there was] published a pamphlet entitled "A General Description of Nova Scotia"…
…Haliburton himself supplies the reason why it was written, – to clear the province of misrepresentation. A banquet was given in his honor in 1839. When his health was proposed, reference was made to his "History", and what he said in reply applies also to the "General Description [of Nova Scotia, published in 1823]"…the precursor of the Historical and Statistical Account [which was published in 1829. Haliburton was 33 years old at the time].


13 – An Historical and Statistical Account of Nova Scotia
In two volumes. Illustrated by a map of the province, and several engravings.
By Thomas C. Haliburton, Esq.
Barrister at Law and Member of the House of Assembly of Nova Scotia
[originally] Printed and Published by Joseph Howe, Halifax 1829
Volume Consulted – Canada Reprint Series #51
Mika Publishing, Belleville, Ontario 1973
HRL SG ADULT 971.6 H172 h 1973

Volume 2 – Pg 104 – 108
The County of Hants, Windsor, King’s College


14 – The Haliburton Bi-Centenary Chaplet:
Papers Presented at the 1996 Thomas Raddall Symposium
Edited by Richard A. Davies
Published – 1997
An Architectural Interpretation of Clifton Grove
by Allen Penny

Pg 104

…Haliburton…started building Clifton…on 30 acres of land purchased in January 1833.


15 – Thomas Chandler Haliburton : A Centenary Chaplet
Published for the Haliburton Club, King’s College, Windsor, NS
by William Briggs Toronto, Ontario 1897
HRL SG REF 921 H172K

Pg 17
…soon after Mr. Haliburton was made a judge…[he moved into] Clifton, a picturesque property to the west of the village, consisting in all of forty acres bounding to the eastward on the village, to the north on the river, and to the South on the lands of King’s College….

16 – The Haliburton Bi-Centenary Chaplet:
Papers Presented at the 1996 Thomas Raddall Symposium
Edited by Richard A. Davies
Published – 1997
An Architectural Interpretation of Clifton Grove
by Allen Penny

Pg 104
It would appear that the house was completed by Christmas 1835, when he was 39 years old. At occupation the family consisted of Haliburton, his wife [Louisa], five daughters ranging in age from 18 to 5 and three sons aged 15, 4 and 3…

17 – The Haliburton Bi-Centenary Chaplet:
Papers Presented at the 1996 Thomas Raddall Symposium
Edited by Richard A. Davies
Published – 1997
An Architectural Interpretation of Clifton Grove
by Allen Penny

Pg 104

… the house was completed by Christmas 1835, when he was 39 years old…


18 – Thomas Chandler Haliburton : A Centenary Chaplet
Published for the Haliburton Club, King’s College, Windsor, NS
by William Briggs Toronto, Ontario 1897
HRL SG REF 921 H172K

Pg 17
…[Clifton was]…underlaid by gypsum, it was much broken up and very uneven; and the enormous amount of earth excavated in opening the gypsum quarries was all needed to make the property a comfortable and suitable place of residence….


19 – Afoot in Ultima Thule – Dal Review Vol #3 Pg 95-105
MacMechan, Archibald (1810 – 1933)
NSARM – Nova Scotia Archives & Records Management
F90 D15
Pg 98

20 – The Clockmaker; The Sayings and Doings of Samuel Slick of Slickville
Thomas Chandler Haliburton
Originally Printed and Published by Joseph Howe, Halifax, 1836
Volume Consulted
The New Canadian Library, General Editor – David Staines
McClelland & Stewart, Toronto, Ontario 1993

Chapter three – The Silent Girls

Pg 23…I never seed or heard of a country that had so many natural privileges as this. Why there are twice as many harbors and water powers here, as we have all the way from Eastport to New Orleens. They have all they can ax, and more than they desarve. They have iron, coal, slate, grindstone, lime, firestone, gypsum, freestone…they don’t know the value of their [province].

Chapter 7 – Go ahead

Pg 39 – 42
…[put] a Rail road to the Bay of Fundy…into operation, and the activity it will inspire into business, the new life it will put into the place, will surprise you…this here rail road will not perhaps beget other rail roads, but it will beget the spirit of enterprise, that will beget other useful improvements. It will enlarge the sphere and the means of trade, open new sources of traffic and supply – develop resources – and what is of more value perhaps than all – beget motion. It will teach folks that go astarn or stand stock still, like the statehouse on Boston…not only to go "ahead," but to nullify time and space.
…What is it,…what is it that ‘fetters’ the heels of a young country, and hangs like ‘a poke’ around it’s neck?what retards the cultivation of its soil, and the improvement of its fisheries? – the high price of labor, I guess. Well, what’s a rail road? The substitution of mechanical for human and animal labor…it is a river, a bridge, a road and canal all in one. It saves what we han’t got to spare, men, horses, carts, vessels, barges, and what’s all in all – time.


21 Thomas Chandler Haliburton : A Study in Provincial Toryism
by Victor Lovitt Oakes Chittick, P.H.D., Professor of Literature and Language at Reed College
New York, Columbia University Press 1924
HRL SG 921 H 172c

Pg 179

…[as] reported in "the Novascotian" (see footnote 1) (footnote 1…June 13, 1839, in an account of a public dinner given Haliburton at Halifax)…

[Spoken by Thomas Chandler Haliburton] …"Shortly after the History of Nova Scotia was written…It occurred to me that it would be advisable to resort to a more popular style, and, under the garb of amusement to call attention to our noble harbors, our great mineral wealth, our healthy climate, our abundant fisheries, and our natural resources and advantages…I was also anxious to stimulate my countrymen to exertion, to direct their attention to the development of those resources, and to works of internal improvement, especially to that great work which I hope I shall live to see completed, the railroad from Halifax to Windsor, to awaken ambition and substitute it for that stimulus which is furnished in other but poorer countries than our own by necessity. For this purpose I called in the aid of the Clockmaker."


22 – A Century of Haliburton’s Nova Scotia
by Archibald MacMechan
Pub 1930
NSARM – Nova Scotia Archives & Records Management
V/F v105 #27

Pg 1 – 3…A banquet was given in his honor in 1839. When his health was proposed, reference was made to his "History", and what he said in reply applies also to the "General Description [of Nova Scotia, published in 1823]"…the precursor of the Historical and Statistical Account [which was published in 1829. Haliburton was 33].
"…I twice visited Great Britain , and was… painfully, impressed with a conviction… that this valuable and important Colony [of Nova Scotia] was not merely wholly unknown, but misunderstood and misrepresented. Every… work that mentioned it, spoke of it in terms of contempt and condemnation. It was said to possess good harbours, if you could find them for the fog, and fisheries that would be valuable if you only had sun enough to cure the fish – while the interior was described as a land of rock and barren, and doomed to unrelenting sterility. Where facts were wanting, recourse was had to imagination; and one author stated that these woods were infested with wolves…he represents them as being endowed by Providence with the remarkable power of ascending trees in pursuit of their prey…It’s name was a name of terror, in the nurseries, and the threat of sending a refactory child to Nova Scotia was equivilent to sending him to the devil."


23 – Memories of Windsor in the Seventies (1870s)
Vroom, F.W. , D.D.
[Written in 1934 – "the Hants Journal Press"]
WHHS Archives
Pg. 14

Clifton Avenue did not become a thoroughfare untill some years later, and there was only a footpath from "Clifton" through the College woods. The right-of-way for this had been purchased from Judge Haliburton in exchange for an extensive field of several acres cut off from the College grounds and added to the "Clifton" property. This field contained the Long Pond which in winter was a favorite skating place, but some years ago the pond went dry.

24 – Notes on the History of King’s College
F.W. Vroom
NSARM – Nova Scotia Archives & Records Management
V/F v.14 #16
Pg 8
…It may be mentioned here that cricket was brought to Windsor about 1845. It was played on the field to the north of the College, part of which is now covered with spruces, and part attached to the Clifton property, having been given to Judge Haliburton in an exchange for a right-of-way through his property to town. The field was near the large elms in the hollow, which stood out prominently with no spruces about them, and hence the name of "the Three Elms Cricket Club", which is so well known in the history of cricket in this province…


25 – Crown Lands Office
Plans in the Hants County Portfolio
26. Plan Water lots Town of Windsor by William Hendry, Dec 31, 1879


26 – Deed – 1842 Land Transfer between T.C. Haliburton and King’s College, Windsor, Nova Scotia
Hants County Registry of Deeds
WHHS Archives
Photocopy of 1842 Deed –

Land Transfer Between King’s College and Thomas Chandler Haliburton –
For the purpose of making a road Etc.
Date and Purpose of Agreement
Halifax, January 28th, 1842

…Whereas the said Governors, President and Fellows of King’s College at Windsor in the Province of Nova Scotia are desirous of obtaining a part of the land of the said Thomas C. Haliburton called Clifton at Windsor aforesaid between the lands of the said College and the back street of Windsor aforesaid commonly called Chapel street [Note: Later called Chapel Lane, now known as Albert Street] for the purpose of making a road for the use of said Governor, President and Fellows of King’s College at Windsor in the Province of Nova Scotia…

…such parcel of land in exchange for an equal quantity of land belonging to said Governors, [etc.] King’s College…

…adjoining the South Eastern boundary of the said lands of the said Thomas C. Haliburton…

(…and also for consideration of the sum of five shillings of lawful money of the province [from King’s to Haliburton]…in hand well and truly placed at or before the ??sealing and delivery of these property…)

…described as follows, beginning at the Public road leading to the Chapel and commonly called Chapel road and running along the devision line of the said Thomas C. Haliburton’s land …untill [until] it reaches the north Eastern angle of the College lands…thence South Westwardly along the Northern line of said lands…thence North Eastwardly…to a stake thence North sixteen degrees east…to a spruce…North…to a spruce stump…at the Eastern side of the deep cut for the Railroad of the said Thomas C. Haliburton…etc….untill (until) it strikes the Public road aforesaid and thence Eastwardly along the Southern side of said road to the place of beginning, Containing one acre two roods and seventeen perches…

(…and also for consideration of the sum of five shillings of lawful money of the province [from Haliburton to King’s]…in hand well and truly placed at or before the ??sealing and delivery of these property…)

…beginning on the line between the College lands and the property of the said Thomas C. Haliburton called Clifton…to the Western line of the College lands thence Northerly along last mentioned line…to the North Western angle of the College lands and thence North Eastwardly…to the place of beginning, Containing one acre two roods and seventeen perches…

27 – Ambrose Church Map of Windsor – 1871
WHHS
Showing – "Clifton", Haliburton’s Grounds. Haliburton’s "Plaster Quarry" running along the North side of Clifton
Showing – A Tri-lobed Pond in the Southern Corner of Clifton Grounds, which is circumnavagated by a road.
Showing – King’s College Grounds
Showing – "Park Street" Later known as "Clifton Avenue",
running from the junction of Gray Street and Albert Street [half of which was formerly Chappel Street.]
Showing – College road – Un-named in the Roe Brother’s map
NOTE: The pond noted on the Southern Corner of Clifton Grounds is the only large pond indicated on the map. Although King’s College Grounds are shown in detail, including the the Professor’s Terrace and the Academy, no pond is noted on the College Grounds or the College road properties, owned in 1871 by Dr. McAulay, H. Bodden (Bedden?), T. Maynard and A.C. Thomas. A few small, irregular shapes appear on Clifton property which appear to be small ponds, but these are one tenth the size of the pond in the southern corner of the property. It May be because the word "Windsor" is written over the area where the King’s College Woods would be that Church has shown neither the woods nor the King’s College Frog Pond in the woods.


28 – Roe Brothers Map of Windsor 1880
Loomer, Leslie – Windsor, A Journey in History –
Published by the West Hants Historic Society, Windsor, Nova Scotia, 1996
HRL 971,635 L863w

Copy of Roe Brothers Map of Windsor, Published 1880
Showing – "Clifton", Haliburton’s Grounds, which are colour coded blue in the original map
Showing – A "Tri-lobed" Pond in the Southern Corner of Clifton Grounds
Showing – King’s College Grounds
Showing – "Park Street" Later known as "Clifton Avenue",
running from the junction of Gray Street and Albert Street [formerly known as Chapel Street]

29 – Birdseye View of Windsor 1878
NSARM – Nova Scotia Archives & Records Management
Photo Negative # OS N69 – 1878

30 – The History of King’s College School – Windsor, Nova Scotia 1788-1938 –
Harris, R. [Reginald Vanderbilt]
Published by "The Outlook", Middleton, Nova Scotia, 1938
HRL SG Ref 373.7163 h315h

pg 33 – …sept 22, 1871, the school building was destroyed by fire which broke out just after morning recess…within a few days the school was reopened in the manor house of "Martock", the property of Col. Edward K.S. Butler on the Chester Road.
…untill June 1873 [at which point] …the school ceased functioning for the next two years.

pg 35 – …Jan 1877…work [on the new school began]…Oct. 29th handed over the building to the board for occupation

31 – DeWolf , Mark and Flie, George
All the Kings Men –
Published by the King’s Alumni Association 1972
HRL SG Adult Lending 378.716 D524s
[Copy owned by WHHS]

Pg 44
On Feb. 5, 1920…By the time water was finally turned to the blaze, it was too late to do anything but try to save the nearby buildings…

32 – Great Windsor Fire – 1897
by Garth Vaughan
www.birthplaceofhockey.com

In 1897, the Great Windsor Fire destroyed 4/5 of the town. Among the buildings lost was Windsor’s first rink [built 1870] on Fort Edward. It was the first building replaced in the town [1897], and eventually became known as the Stannus Street Rink . It is believed to be the oldest standing wooden, natural ice rink in Canada. The town was rebuilt within three years but never regained the vitality of those earlier years. In 1920 another fire burned the main King’s college buildings and a decision was made to rebuild the college in Halifax. Steamboats continued the shipping business to and from Windsor into the 1950s when highway transportation dealt a great blow to the shipping industry of the town.

33 – The History of King’s College School – Windsor, Nova Scotia 1788-1938 –
Harris, R. [Reginald Vanderbilt]
Published by "The Outlook", Middleton, Nova Scotia, 1938
HRL SG Ref 373.7163 h315h
Pg 35 – …Jan 1877…work [on the new school began]…Oct. 29th handed over the building to the board for occupation

34 – The History of King’s College School – Windsor, Nova Scotia 1788-1938 –
Harris, R. [Reginald Vanderbilt]
Published by "The Outlook", Middleton, Nova Scotia, 1938
HRL SG Ref 373.7163 h315h

pg 37 – 39 (Between 1892 – 1894)
…Among the improvements to the plants and buildings we find that the Board had the barn at the back of the building removed, a cricket pitch layed out, terraces built and the playing field drained, and an open-air skating rink built for winter use…

Note: Added Oct 2003 –
35 – Plans in the Hants County Portfolio
#13 Layout of Lots on Road to Falmouth [undated – c.1800]
NOTE: Shows along Waterfront
– Road to Falmouth [Written along what is now called Water Street]
– John Clark Esq. Warfe lot (1000 or 1800?) N35 W300 foot
– Neal Geachy (1000 or 1800?) N35 W300 foot
– Landing Place
– Cpt Monk
– Josh Mauger
– Isaac Deschamps

– "King (Street)" [hand written in and then crossed out] "Albert St.
Note: Appears to actually be "King Street" which is the name of the street that runs along the base of Fort Edward Hill in Windsor.

Streetfront Lots –
– 1. T Bridge J ___ 1773
– 2. J Butler
– 3. L Louberlahter (?)
– 4. J Burbidge
– 5. Capt. Shammus _ _ (?)
– 6. J Gerrish
– 7. Fred Deslesdernier & Capt. _ Grounld
– 8. Avery
– 9. S Cottnum
– 10. Palmer
– 11. Mist Franklin
– 12. Lord William
– 13. B Gerrish
– 14. ?

Across the street –
– Farnum (?)
– Crowell


 

  Origin   Evolution   Hockeyists   Windsor   Home   Site Map   Contact   Links   ©

All text contained in the birthplaceofhockey.com website © by Garth Vaughan 2001. All rights reserved. All images contained in the birthplaceofhockey.com website © Garth Vaughan 2001. All rights reserved. No part of the contents of this site may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including printing, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval system without written permission from Garth Vaughan, except for the inclusion of brief quotations in a review.